Tag Archives: transistor

The Transistor (1953)

I think this may be the most (unintentionally) hysterical thing I’ve seen in a good long time (oh, the world of the future):

I mean seriously side-splitting, tears streaming down the face, really truly, delightfully, must-see funny. (I love the wrist device! Dick Tracy has come true in that regard. And just imagine: portable televisions!)

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Three-peat

threeLast fall I kicked off a series of math-y posts with On the Count of Three, some thoughts about the groupings of three that occur around us, both naturally and in things we create. The idea of triplets is an obvious progression from the idea of binary opposition — quintessentially expressed in the metaphor of Yin and Yang.

Ever since that post, I’ve been noticing (and then noting) various instances of triplets. It really is a fundamental way reality expresses itself. (And more than just metaphorically — matter literally has three-ness!)

Here are some of the other triples I’ve noted…

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Logically Speaking

ttab adder fullIf it hasn’t been apparent, I’ve been giving a bit of a fall semester in some computer science basics. If it seems complicated, well, the truth is all we’ve done is peek in some windows. From a safe distance. And most of the blinds were down.

I thought we’d finish (yes, finish!) with a bang and take a deep dive down into the lowest levels of a computer, both on the engineering side and on the abstract logic side. When they say, “It’s all ones and zeros,” these are the bits (in both senses!) they mean.

Attention: You need to be at least this geeky for this ride!

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The Computer Connectome

circuitThe computer what? Connectome. The computer’s wiring diagram. The road map of how all the parts are connected.

Okay, granted, the term, connectome, usually applies to the neural wiring of a biological organism’s brain, particularly to the human brain. But the whole point of this series of posts is to compare a human brain with a computer so that we can think about how we might implement a human mind with a computer. As such, “connectome” seems apropos.

Today we’ll try to figure out what’s involved in modeling one in software.

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